Places

This is the place to come to learn about places!

This delightful village, as the name suggests, is long and thin! It is mainly situated on either side of a mile long stretch of road, and although both the pub, old school and church are now private houses
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Marden is one of the largest parishes in Herefordshire, and lies just off the main Hereford to Leominster road, six miles from Hereford.
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The village of Mathon was originally cut in half by the boundary between Herefordshire and Worcestershire, but most of the original village now lies in Herefordshire. Continue reading

The small village of Moccas is on the south bank of the River Wye twelve miles from Hereford, and the name is made up of two Welsh words – mochyn meaning pig, and rhos meaning moor.

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Monkland lies three miles from Leominster, and was the home of the Reverend Sir Henry Williams Baker, who not only wrote many hymns but also was the author of “Hymns Ancient and Modern”.

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Mordiford lies by the River Lugg at the foot of a beautiful wood some 4 miles from Hereford, and was once an important mining village. A rather lovely 9 span bridge over the river was once a useful source of silver spurs for the king………apparently every time a king crossed the bridge the local lords of the manors had to give him a pair!!
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Much Marcle is a sprawling village set about four miles from Ledbury on the Ross on Wye road. Agriculture has always been the main occupation for villagers, although cider making has also provided employment.
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The tiny village of Munsley can be found up a very narrow lane some 4 miles from Ledbury. Local legend has it that Shakespeare’s Prince of Denmark is buried here.
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The village of Norton Canon gets its name from the manor of Norton, which together with the manors of Hope, Preston and Pyon were given to the Canons of Hereford Cathedral by Godiva and Vulviva Leofric in 1086
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The picturesque small town of Pembridge is an absolute delight, with many half timbered buildings, some of which dated from the 15th century.  There is one charming cottage which dates back to 1425 .
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Pipe Aston, originally just Aston, gained it’s prefix because of its famed clay pipes made in the 17th and 18th centuries, and lies just south west of Ludlow in beautiful countryside – ( Where in Herefordshire is there not such a place!) It boasts a community of less than 30 inhabitants
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Pixley is a tiny village which lies on a part of the Roman road stretching from Dymock in Gloucestershire to Dinmore in Herefordshire.
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Preston is a fairly common place name, which comes from Presetune (used in the Doomsday Book 1086) meaning Priest Town, and this village sits on the bank of the river Wye some 8 miles from Hereford. Continue reading

The small village of Putley lies some five miles west of Ledbury and is somewhat strung out, but it boasts two 18th century Manor houses – Putley Court and Brainge Court.
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The old market town of Ross on Wye sits overlooking the River Wye, on the edge of the Forest of Dean, and was originally just “Ross”. In 1931, the name was changed to Ross on Wye. The Market House is 17th century and still hosts markets twice a week.
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There is some debate as to the correct spelling for this little village, but Rowlestone or Rowlstone are both accepted. The village lies in south Herefordshire and is gloriously sprawling, with cottages and farms enjoying splendid isolation. Continue reading

The lovely, secluded village of Sollers Hope was the home of Dick Whittington and his family who lived here between 1300 and 1546, but should be better known for the family De Solers who gave their name to the village.
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The Lacy part of this village’s name comes from Walter de Lacy who was killed in 1085 falling from his new church in Hereford. He had vast estates all over Herefordshire, and these passed to his son Roger. Continue reading

Tupsley used to be a small village a short distance from Hereford, but since the last war it has expanded considerably – so much so that it now forms part of Hereford City.
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The tiny village of Turnastone has remained remarkably unchanged and unspoilt over the centuries, although some beautiful barns are now being converted into houses, and the old cottages have been modernised.
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The large village of Walford is some 2 miles south of Ross on Wye, on the edge of the Forest of Dean and the name is believed to come from “Wales Ford” where the old track to Wales crossed the River Wye..
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Warham lies within the parish of Breinton and is close to the River Wye just to the west of Hereford, with the name meaning “dwelling by the water”. Continue reading

Whitchurch is situated on a bank above the River Wye between Ross on Wye and Hereford. The name Whitchurch possibly dates from Saxon times when buildings were generally made with wood, and a stone church would in contrast seem white….therefore, White Church. This eventually became Whitchurch, and is a fairly common name in the British Isles
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