Places

This is the place to come to learn about places!

Almeley (meaning Elm Meadow) was built in it’s glorious location in the Herefordshire countryside over a thousand years ago, and has views over the Wye Valley, Brecon Beacons and the Black Mountains.  Continue reading

Aylton is a tiny village near to the market town of Ledbury  and its current population of around 100 is not much different to what it was 150 years ago. Continue reading

The village of Blakemere is tiny, and lies about half way between Hereford and Hay on Wye.  Some of the few houses date back to the sixteenth century and even earlier in some cases and all in all it is a delightful hamlet.
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Brinsop is a small village to the north west of Hereford, close to Credenhill – the peaceful and pretty countryside around the village is reputed to be where St. George killed the dragon!

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The Frome part of this village’s name is said to come from that Latin word for beautiful, “formosus” and like a great many other villages in Herefordshire this is certainly true for Castle Frome which lies 6 miles from Ledbury.
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This tiny village sits in the far northeast corner of Herefordshire, close to Ledbury and Colwall, and the name Coddington derives from the Anglo Saxon “Coton” – the plural of “Cote” which means a collection of mud cottages.
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Colwall nestles on the lower Western slopes of the Malvern Hills and is equidistant (about 4 miles) from both Malvern and Ledbury. The name originally meant the place with the cool well, and the numerous wells in the area are world famous.
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The tiny village of Cusop lies very close to the Welsh border, just over a mile from Hay on Wye and the surroundings are absolutely glorious.
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The very pretty village of Dilwyn is part of the popular Black and White trail in Herefordshire, and lies near to both Kington and Leominster whilst Hereford is some 11 miles away to the south.
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The small village of Docklow lies about five miles east of Leominster and 15 miles northeast of Hereford, on a branch of the river Wye.
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Eastnor is a tiny village just a mile or so from Ledbury, which is dominated by Eastnor Castle, work on which was started in 1810, and completed in 1820.

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The village of Eye is conjoined with Moreton and Ashton and sits some three and a half miles north of Leominster.  “Eye” means island, and the naming of the village thus might be explained by the fact that it lies between two streams.
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The village of Foy lies some 3 miles from Ross on Wye,  and is tiny with just a small handful of houses and farms.
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The village of Ganarew, named from the Welsh for “pass of the hill” meaning placed between two hills, is on the border of Herefordshire close to Monmouth. The setting is glorious.
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For those with ancestors from Garway, you may be interested to know that the name derives from “gwrwe” meaning a marsh, or from “gwre” meaning a camp, and “wy” or “wey” meaning water. Therefore – a camp by the water.
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Hereford lies on the bank of the River Wye, and is the county town of Herefordshire. Henry 1st gave Hereford City status in 1154, and this was reaffirmed by Queen Elizabeth in 2000.
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Five miles southeast of Hereford, this parish sits on the bank of the River Wye;  the name Holme Lacy means “the low lying meadow belonging to the Lacys”’
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The village of Ivington is in the parish of Leominster and lies on a branch of the River Lugg. Nearby on Brierley Hills there is an ancient camp which was occupied by Owen Glendower
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The village of Kings Caple, nearly five miles from Ross on Wye, gained its name by dint of the fact that during the time of the Norman Conquest the residents were Welsh speaking people who owed allegiance to English kings – as opposed to neighbouring How Caple and Caplefore (Brockhampton) which belonged to the Canons of Hereford Cathedral.
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In 1055, the Welsh thronged over the border and attacked Hereford, and Harold Godwinson was appointed to sort things out. He managed to push the Welsh back as far as Radnor, and then promptly dispossessed many of the surrounding land owners, dividing the spoils between himself, the king and some of his officers in the army. The settlement became known as the king’s town and eventually Kington. By 1287, Kington had spread further down the hill, close to where the present centre is.
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